About "The Mountain" work/exhibition
About "The Mountain" work/exhibition
THE MOUNTAIN - Installation preview at the Museum of Contemporary Native Art, Santa Fe, NM 2013
THE MOUNTAIN - Installation preview at the Museum of Contemporary Native Art, Santa Fe, NM 2013
^ (Looking For Tsosido)
^ (Looking For Tsosido)
^^ (Resource)
^^ (Resource)
Interview about The Mountain exhibition from anonymous source
Interview about The Mountain exhibition from anonymous source
About "The Mountain" work/exhibition
About "The Mountain" work/exhibitionThe Mountain is a three channel video installation exploring two of the four outlying sacred mountains for Navajo (Diné) people; the eastern mountain known as Sis’ Najinni (Blanca Peak), and the western mountain, Dook’o’osliid (San Francisco Peaks). To begin to understand these mountains, I traveled to each one of them and hiked up and around these formations, documenting my experience in many different ways.  These outings were essential for me in building an understanding of important places of cultural origins, as well as the physicality of being there in my lifetime. Specific Navajo (Diné) emergent stories and mythologies associated with each mountain are intentionally not discussed in this work, because holding onto that knowledge represents a form of power I reserve for the discourse between Diné (Navajo).  Also denying the general audience access to specific sacred content serves a postcolonial function in the work related to indigenous art installations. Therefore, The Mountain installation is designed and conceptualized as a space of facilitation, including objects I consider to be ethereal artifacts of process, and sculptured ceramic forms denoting the natural world and their potential symbols of passage and designation. Most important in the work is the looping three channel videos that represent chapters in an emerging series, each associated with a different mountain, but arranged together as a linear dialogue to bridge an over all narrative.-SJY
THE MOUNTAIN - Installation preview at the Museum of Contemporary Native Art, Santa Fe, NM 2013
^ (Looking For Tsosido)Chapter one: ^ (Looking For Tsosido) explores the personal narrative of journey, revealed in generational forms of child, current self representation, and a quasi father figure, or spiritual memory. The origin of the Tsosido concept comes from my biological father, who I barely knew.  The translation of the name has never been revealed to me from any living family member.  Therefore, Tsosido functions as a point of personal reference, an evolving polymorphous mythology containing the framework for building new meaning.
^^ (Resource)Chapter two: ^^ (Resource) relates to Dook’o’osliid (San Francisco Peaks, Arizona), and represent the mountain as a natural resource for communities beyond the Navajo (Diné) sphere. The implications of the resource in this way can be interpreted literally through private interactions and interpretations at any given moment in the urban spaces beyond the source.  The resource is also forced into a dialogue because of juxtaposing shot arrangements, always being reminded of relationships, whether obvious or not.
Interview about The Mountain exhibition from anonymous source
Interview about The Mountain exhibition from anonymous sourceWhat drew you into art?I’ve always been interested in creating things, mostly for no reason at all, but because it is my nature.  How I became an artist however is another thing all together.  That was born from the many failed attempts at trying to make things for a reason. I think finding a purpose through that process was and is ultimately a deeply fulfilling occurrence, so I continue in that way today.Who do you credit with supporting and encouraging you in your art?When I was younger, my mother was my biggest supporter, but over time, the close network of Phoenix artists, have positively impacted my life.  My family and artist friends today continue to be the encouragement and sounding board I need at times to continue what I do, and I’m grateful for this.How does being a Native person shape your art, your creative vision, and the ideas of your work?   I think as indigenous people in the 21st Century, we have a unique and valuable perspective about the world we live in. I attribute this through my family experience and the land and place we come from.  We are all part of a colonized experience in some form, and as an indigenous person, I try to understand my place in the world through this overt and subliminal process.  I acknowledge shared histories and personal experience and attempt at a sustainable relationship with everything and everyone in my life. Most of us in our creative work hope to provoke some kind of reaction in the viewer or “audience”: is that true for you? How so?Yes, I hope my work in general is interesting and thought provoking for both indigenous and non-indigenous people.  I think my work in “The Mountain” installation touches on significant places as well as the surreal narratives of place. I’m hoping the viewer is both fulfilled in some sense, and can walk away from the installation with unanswered questions.  This for me gives the work more life beyond the brief encounter of the museum space. Is “the mountain” a physical place or something more spiritually and creatively located? “The Mountain” as an installation and a body of work represents both the physical space and the metaphor. The stories associated with mountains as mythological places of birth, renewal and the spiritual are well documented, so I believe the universality of the mountain as a place of significance should be discernable in this work. The new work at The Museum of Contemporary Native Art in Santa Fe, New Mexico represents an introduction installation into a series of work associated with the outlying sacred mountains for Navajo people.  “The Mountain” in this iteration explores two mountains, Sis’ Najinni (Blanca Peak), and Dook’o’osliid (San Francisco Peaks). “The Mountain” reveals the stories of journey, process, and revelation.  It contains the privately sacred and the mundane.  It represents the greater resource for sustenance and economy, but is ultimately an exchange of mysteries.You move among various creative media, from video to sculpture. How does each medium open up new ways of expression for you?Each medium represents a framework of limited possibilities, yet can be understood as a tradition and foundation in which to build other work from. I began as a painter, and while I still consider myself one, my evolution into a multimedia practice has opened up greater possibilities in my work.  It’s true the idea will sometimes be the defining factor in what medium should be used, but there is nothing wrong with trying to force a circle into a square.
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